• Write a Review
  • Boards
  • Log In
  • Find a Cruise
  • Deals
  • Excursions
  • More
You may also like
Dismiss
CDC Extends Its No-Sail Order to September 30
Exterior on Norwegian Breakaway

CDC Extends Its No-Sail Order to September 30

CDC Extends Its No-Sail Order to September 30
Exterior on Norwegian Breakaway

July 16, 2020

Aaron Saunders
Contributor
By Aaron Saunders
  • Facebook
  • Pinterest
  • Twitter
(7:05 p.m. EDT) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention has issued an extension of its No Sail Order that was due to expire July 24, extending it until September 30, 2020, for all cruises out of U.S. ports of call.
The order, which
first was issued March 14
and extended for 100 days in April, comes on the heels of Cruise Lines International Association, the industry's largest trade organization, announcing that its member lines
would voluntarily suspend all cruise
operations until September 15.
The CDC notes its order is in effect until either: the expiration of the Secretary of Health and Human Services' declaration that COVID-19 constitutes a public health emergency; the CDC director rescinds or modifies the order based on specific public health or other considerations; or until September 30.
"CDC supports the decision by the Cruise Line
sic
International Association (CLIA) and its members to voluntarily extend the suspension of operation for passenger cruise ship travel," notes
the CDC report
. "However, because not all cruise ship operators subject to the No Sail Order are members of CLIA or have made similar commitments, CDC is extending its No Sail Order to ensure that passenger operations do not resume prematurely."

Which Lines Are Affected?

Carnival Panorama (Photo: Carnival Cruise Line)
As with the CDC's previous guidance, the No Sail Order affects vessels with the capacity to carry more than 250 people on voyages with overnight stays sailing from, to or within U.S jurisdictional waters are affected.
Most of the lines that would be affected by this ruling -- Carnival, Norwegian, and Royal Caribbean brands -- have already voluntarily suspended sailing into September and beyond.
Although many lines have stated their intention to restart in mid-September, the encouraging news here is that, unlike the initial guidance issued in March and then April, the CDC and CLIA seem to be on the same page when it comes to when cruises could potentially resume within U.S. territorial waters.
In a statement about the extension from the CDC, CLIA lauded the CDC's commitment to working with the cruise line industry toward a healthy and safe restart.
"As reflected in today's announcement, CLIA and its member lines remain aligned with the CDC in our commitment to public health and safety," the statement read. "We are also pleased that the CDC has announced its intention to issue a request for information about the industry's resumption of passenger operations. As we continue to work towards the development of enhanced protocols to support the safe resumption of cruise operations around the world, we look forward to timely and productive dialogue with the CDC to determine measures that will be appropriate for ocean-going cruise operations to resume in the United States when the time is right."

What About International Cruises?

Barcelona Port
International cruise operations are not affected at this time, as they fall outside of the jurisdiction of the CDC. Only voyages from, to or within the United States are affected.
New verbiage in the CDC's extension, though, makes it clear that ships operating outside of the United States cannot enter any U.S. waterway or call on any U.S. port while the CDC's No Sail Order is in effect.

What Progress Has Been Made For Cruise to Resume?

The Balcony Cabin on Norwegian Bliss (Photo: Cruise Critic)
The CDC states it has spent roughly 38,000 hours on the cruise ship COVID-19 response since March 14. It also says other government agencies, including Health and Human Services, additionally have invested thousands of hours.
"CDC continues to have regular conversations by phone and email with cruise lines, often daily," according to the CDC.
The CDC, though, places much of the onus for the continued suspension of service squarely on the cruise lines, citing myriad infractions in social distancing protocols during the time since sailings have been suspended.
The CDC was also critical of cruise lines that attempted to transfer crewmembers outside of U.S. waters while noting that only one cruise line -- Bahamas Paradise -- had met the criteria set forth on its color-coded crew repatriation chart.
Numerous lines, like Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises, utilized their private islands in the Bahamas to sail crewmembers to their home countries when the CDC prevented repatriation by air.
"Alleged instances of non-compliance included not adhering to social distancing protocols; unauthorized crew transfers while outside of U.S. waters; not submitting weekly surveillance data (through the EDC form); not relocating all crew to single-occupancy cabins with private bathrooms; not cancelling all social gatherings; and not closing all crew bars, gyms, or other group settings," the CDC report stated.
Many of these recommendations would be difficult to adhere to on ships, particularly when crew morale is at a low ebb and repatriation efforts have been ongoing.
"Lack of Consensus Among Cruise Ship Operators and Need for Additional Industry-led Efforts Regarding Safely Resuming Passenger Operations" is the headline of one subhead of the CDC document issued July 16.
The CDC notes that for the period from March 1 to July 10, a total of 2,973 COVID-19 cases or "COVID-like illnesses" were found on cruise ships, in addition to 34 deaths.
COVID-19 cases in the United States
are now increasing
at a rate of 63,000 new infections per day.
Cruise Critic will update this story with more information as it emerges. A list of currently expected resumption of service dates
can be found here.
How was this article?
Popular with cruisers like you
When Are Cruise Lines Around the World Expected To Resume Service?

(Updated 5:37 p.m. EDT) -- With ocean and river cruise lines temporarily suspending service around the world as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, keeping track of the seemingly minute-by-minute changes to the cruise industry can be challenging.

Most cruise lines voluntarily paused sailings for the meantime after being faced with port closures; a lack of suitable infrastructure, including flights; and increased travel restrictions that change on a country-by-country basis. CLIA,the Cruise Lines International Association that represents most cruise lines, issued a further volunatary suspension in operations through September 15.

Adding to voluntary suspen

German Cruise Line AIDA Delays Service Resumption, Pending More Approvals

(10:40 a.m. EDT) -- The German cruise line AIDA canceled its planned resumption of service this weekend over an approval technicality.

The line, which is owned by Carnival Corporation & plc., has implemented new health and testing protocols that had caught 10 crew members who were positive for COVID-19 after they boarded two AIDA ships but before any passengers came aboard. 

The hold-up for AIDAperla and AIDAmar, leaving on short cruises August 5 and August 12, though, came because the country of Italy, where the ships are flagged, had not given approval for the ships to sail, the company said in a release.

"Contrary to our expectations, the final formal approval for the start of th

MSC Plans Two-Ship August Cruise Startup for Europeans, 14 Ships for October 31

(12:05 p.m. EDT) -- Following the implementation of new health and safety protocols, MSC Cruises is planning a two-ship restart in the Mediterranean this month for European residents only, followed by a larger restart of 14 vessels on October 31, 2020.

The potential summer restart would see MSC Grandiosa and MSC Magnifica welcome Schengen (EU) residents on voyages to the Mediterranean. MSC is still awaiting approval of these voyages, which would run one week in duration. Ports would include Greece and Malta, where MSC notes that cruises have officially been welcomed, and countries have reviewed, and support, MSC's safety protocols and restart of operations.

MSC notes these itineraries

Alaska Makes Changes to COVID-19 Regulations, Testing That Could Affect Cruise Restart

(Updated 5:28 p.m. EDT) -- Just two days after the first ship of the season set sail in Alaska, the state has announced sweeping new changes to its COVID-19 testing policy for out-of-state visitors that could dramatically curb tourism there.

Starting on Tuesday, August 11 -- eight days from now -- the State of Alaska will begin requiring all non-resident travelers to take and pass a COVID-19 test within 72 hours before they arrive.

Previously, the State of Alaska allowed travelers to be tested at the airport for COVID-19; to obtain a COVID-negative molecular PCR test up to five days prior to arrival; or to quarantine upon arrival. Those options will now be eliminated as

COVID-19 Passenger Outbreaks Take Place On Two International Cruise Lines

(10 a.m. EDT) -- The international cruise industry took a step back this weekend, as two lines that had restarted operations reported COVID-19 outbreaks among passengers and crew.

Both lines -- Hurtigruten in Norway and Paul Gauguin in French Polynesia -- had restarted operations with clearly laid out health and safety guidelines for passengers and crew.

Hurtigruten has suspended all expedition sailings that were planned on three of its ships -- Roald Amundsen, Fridtjof Nansen and MS Spitsbergen.

The outbreaks show that much is still unknown about COVID-19 and the best way to prevent the disease from spreading, particularly among asymptomatic individuals and groups living together i

Want to cruise smarter?
Get expert advice, insider tips and more.
By proceeding, you agree to Cruise Critic’s Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.